‘I will be OK,’ Carli Lloyd tweets after knee injury

Carli Lloyd on the bench and on ice after leaving a Houston Dash game early in the first half with a knee injury on April 23, 2016. Houston beat the Orlando Pride 3-1 at the Citrus Bowl. (Alex Menendez/Getty Images)

Carli Lloyd ices her knee after leaving a Houston Dash game early in the first half on April 23, 2016. Houston beat the Orlando Pride 3-1 at the Citrus Bowl. (Alex Menendez/Getty Images)

No real news in Carli Lloyd’s first message since a knee injury forced her to leave a Houston Dash game after just 14 minutes Saturday.

I suppose it’s a good sign that she doesn’t sound morose, like she might if she already knew the injury was something serious.

An MRI is scheduled for Sunday.

At this point, any surgery beyond the most minor scoping would almost certainly knock the Women’s World Player of the Year out of this summer’s Rio Olympics.

Megan Rapinoe posted this photo shortly after her knee surgery in December 2015.

Megan Rapinoe posted this photo after her knee surgery in December.

Meanwhile, Megan Rapinoe, Lloyd’s fellow midfield wizard, is a long shot to be fully healed from her knee surgery in time for the Summer Games.

Fortunately, the U.S. team has a wealth of talent in midfield — Tobin Heath, Christen Press, Morgan Brian, Lindsey Horan, Allie Long, Sam Mewis, Heather O’Reilly (even though Mewis and Bryan — and to some extent Horan —  are often used in holding roles).

Plus, Kelley O’Hara, Crystal Dunn and Julie Johnston,  all listed as defenders, are all more than capable of sliding up if needed.

But make no mistake: If my choice is playing with or without Lloyd and Rapinoe, I choose “with” every time.

The good news about Lloyd’s injury: She played for almost 10 minutes after she went down and, after coming off, she stayed on the sideline with ice on the knee.

After the match — a 3-0 victory by her Houston Dash over the Orlando Pride — Lloyd stuck around to sign autographs, according to ESPNW.

I’m no orthopedist, but that doesn’t suggest wrenching pain.

The bad news: It was a non-contact injury. If an athlete crumbles to the ground and no one knocked her there, it could mean something internal failed.  Like a knee ligament.

We’ll know on Sunday.

 

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