5 additional things you might not know about USA vs. Colombia

Apr 6, 2016; East Hartford, CT, USA; Colombia midfielder Nataly Arias (14) reacts against the United States of America during the first half at Pratt & Whitney Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Mark L. Baer-USA TODAY Sports Soccer: U.S. Women's National Team Friendly Soccer Match-Columbia at USA

Colombia’s Nataly Arias knew things weren’t going well against Team USA.  (Mark L. Baer/USA Today Sports)

The U.S. women overwhelmed Colombia on Wednesday (April 6) in East Hartford, Conn., scoring four goals in one 12-minute stretch on the way to a 7-0 rout.

Part two of a two-part beatdown could come Sunday (April 10) when the two teams square off in Chester, Penn. The game, at 1 p.m. CT, is on ESPN.

In Beatdown Part 1,  Colombia looked nothing like the second-best women’s team in South America.  It looked nothing like the gritty, confident team that fought its way into the Round of 16 at  last summer’s World Cup by playing Mexico to a 1-1 draw and upsetting France, one of the best teams in the world, 2-0 in group play.

On Wednesday, the Colombians looked like the Washington Generals: They knew they were going to  lose, they knew they looked silly, and they didn’t seem to mind.

Maybe Sunday’s game will be better.

But maybe not.

Here are five oddities, curiosities, or (possibly) interesting facts about the games and their participants:

 

1.

The teams have met four times, and Colombia has yet to score. Before Wednesday, the Americans won 3-0 in 2011, 3-0 in 2012, and 2-0 in 2015.

 

2.

Christen Press’s goal Wednesday, a beautiful, curling strike, was the 32nd of her career, tying her with Lindsay Tarpley for 16th on the team’s scoring list.

 

3.

Allie Long, making just her fifth appearance, had two goals.

Two is now her career total.

 

4.

The two matches with  Colombia are the only ones on the U.S. schedule until June 2, when Japan visits.

2016-Rio-Olympic-Logo-7That will change. Other games will be added as the team continues its preparations for the 2016 Summer Olympics, which open Aug. 5  in Rio de Janeiro.  U.S. Soccer has already said, for example, that a second match will take place in June, but no details have been disclosed.

 

5.

If Mallory Pugh makes the Olympic roster and is used in a game in Brazil — and I would bet yes on both of those – she will be the youngest American ever to play in an Olympics.  Pugh, a high school senior, turns 18 on April 29.

Mallory Pugh vs. Colombia, East Hartford, Conn., April 6, 2016. (Mark L. Baer/USA Today Sports)

Mallory Pugh vs. Colombia, East Hartford, Conn., April 6, 2016. (Mark L. Baer/USA Today Sports)

 

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2 thoughts on “5 additional things you might not know about USA vs. Colombia

  1. One additional thing you might like to know is that Colombia had not played a game since August of 2015 and although they have been in camp, none of them have been paid for 4 months. So maybe their performance shouldn’t be judged so harshly. Flippantly saying they didn’t care about their performance is just plain disrespectful.

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